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Abstract

I explore an alternative representation of the conflicted mother-daughter trope in Elizabeth Nunez’s Bruised Hibiscus (2000) and Patricia Powell’s The Pagoda (1998), in which the daughters do not leave the Caribbean space to reconcile their struggle with their cultural identity and understanding their homeland. This rejects the conflation the mother and Caribbean space of earlier texts. These texts, instead, conflate the Caribbean space with an othermother figure and the lost or distant mother with the distant motherland. Successful othermothers, as representatives of the homeland, reconcile the space of the homeland for the daughter, which transforms the Caribbean homeland into the new motherland and enables the daughter to understand herself as subject and establish a cultural identity as citizen.

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