Title

A Study Of The Relationship Of Alienation To The Constructs Of Inclusion, Achievement And Affiliation In A Selected Private School

Date of Award

1980

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Abstract

Background. The widespread existence of alienation among students of high school age has been a cause of major concern in recent years. Yet, when a student enters a high school, generally the only aspects taken into account are test scores and academic grades. The psychological dimension is ignored.Purpose. The primary purpose of this research was to study the relationship between Alienation and the constructs Achievement, Affiliation, and Inclusion which describe behavior.Procedures. A theoretical framework was developed to establish a link between External Locus of Control as described by Rotter (1966) and Alienation. Student Behavior was reflected by the constructs Achievement, Affiliation, and Inclusion.It was hypothesized that a significant relationship existed between Alienation and the constructs Achievement, Affiliation, and Inclusion. The Pearson r correlation coefficient was used to test this hypothesis. It was also hypothesized that a significant difference existed between males and females, between grades nine, ten, eleven, and twelve, and between Anglo-American students and Hispanic-American students on scores for Alienation, Achievement, Affiliation, and Inclusion. Analysis of variance was used to test these hypotheses.The Rotter Internal-External Locus of Control Scale and the Student Behavior Description Questionnaire were used to collect data from 542 students in grades nine through twelve in a non-public senior high school in Dade County, Florida.Findings. Analysis indicated that the relationship between Alienation and Achievement scores and Alienation and Affiliation scores was significant. The difference between Anglo-American and Hispanic-American students on scores for Achievement, Affiliation, and Inclusion was significant.Post Hoc Findings. Ninth grade Hispanic-American students were significantly more alienated than ninth grade Anglo-American students, while tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade Hispanic-American students were significantly less alienated than the Anglo-American students in the corresponding grades. Hispanic-American students in grades nine, ten, and eleven had significantly higher achievement scores than their Anglo-American counterparts. At the twelfth grade level Anglo-American students reflect significantly higher scores on Achievement than Hispanic-American students. Affiliation and Inclusion scores were significantly higher for ninth, tenth, and eleventh grade Hispanic-American students. The converse was true for twelfth grade students. Hispanic-American males reflected significantly higher scores on Achievement than Anglo-American males while Anglo-American females scored significantly higher than the Hispanic-American females.Conclusions. Based on the hypotheses and findings of the study and in light of the limitations, the following conclusions were drawn: (1) Alienated high school students experience low levels of task accomplishment and do not enjoy the satisfaction that comes from academic success. Additionally, they do not identify with the emphasis which their parents place on good grades and do not perceive their teachers as motivating them. Finally, alienated students see themselves as lacking independence. (2) Alienated students experience difficulty with feelings of friendship or affection. Their ability to enjoy friendly relationships, confide in and discuss problems with friends, and be at ease with other students is curtailed. They experience difficulty in having friendly social relations with their parents. Their involvement in extra-curricular activities is limited. (3) Alienation and the constructs Achievement, Affiliation, and Inclusion play a key role at the high school level within the parameters of grade level, sex, and ethnic background. The Internal-External Locus of Control Scale and the Student Behavior Description Questionnaire are vital to understanding how these constructs are interrelated.

Keywords

Education, Secondary

Link to Full Text

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