Title

Might Does Not Make Right: International Law And The Question Of Palestine

Date of Award

1981

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Abstract

Over the past five centuries the Western powers have originated and advocated norms of international law to guide international relations. In the case of Palestine these norms were breached by the very powers that developed them. The occupation of Palestine by alien stock, the uprooting of the natives, and the establishment of Israel on its ruins were direct results of Western manipulation and in flagrant violation of the norms of international law accepted by states. The establishment of Israel in 1948 was achieved by force and was not based on legal grounds. Israel's treatment of the native Palestinians was based on the principles of Zionism, a colonial and racially exclusivist movement. Israel's policies in Occupied Palestine pay no attention to the calls of international communities and to the provisions of international conventions and agreements. As a result, the region and the entire world is threatened with the break out of a large-scale war. To defuse the tension, Israel should be made accountable for her actions and the international community should exercise its authority to put an end to the illegalities that were created in Palestine by Western political manipulation.

Keywords

Political Science, International Law and Relations

Link to Full Text

http://access.library.miami.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:8121121