Title

Hostility, Harassment, And Type A As Determinants Of Physiological Reactivity

Date of Award

1982

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Physiological reactions of male subjects were monitored under conditions of interpersonal competition, blocking of goal-directed behavior during competition, and harassment during competition. Subjects were classified as Type A or B with a structured interview, and completed a battery of measures assessing dimensions of anger and hostility. The major findings were as follows: Harassment elicited marked elevations in systolic blood pressure and heart rate relative to the other two conditions; Type As were more reactive than Bs in the Harassment condition, whereas Bs exceeded As in the competition-only condition; self-reported hostility was modestly related to reactivity; among high-hostile individuals, Type A behavior, outwardly-directed anger, and overt manifestation of hostility predicted reactivity, whereas, among low-hostile individuals, suppression of anger tended to predict reactivity. The findings were discussed with regard to mechanisms mediating psychological variables and cardiovascular disease.

Keywords

Psychology, Psychobiology

Link to Full Text

http://access.library.miami.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:8227779