Title

Coping and self care of incarcerated male first time and multiple offenders

Date of Award

2003

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Nursing

First Committee Member

Georgie Labadie, Committee Chair

Abstract

This study was designed to investigate coping and self-care in a sample of incarnated males. The sample consisted of two groups of inmates. One group was first time offenders and the other group was multiple offenders. The sample included males who were 16 through 77 years of age. Three instruments were used in the study. These instruments were the Jalowiec Coping Scale (JCS), the Denyes Self-Care Agency (DSCAI-90) and a Demographic and General Information Form. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and correlations. The results of the study were as follows: There were no differences in coping of the first time offenders and the multiple offenders with the exception of the "palliative" coping use strategy. The multiple offenders had a higher coping use level for palliative coping than the first time offender. No other statistically significant findings were present. There was a difference in self-care of the first time offenders and multiple offenders. A statistically significant difference between the groups on the DSCAI was that the multiple offenders had a higher level of "energy" than the first time offender. There was a negative association between coping and self-care of first time offenders and multiple offenders when the variable "energy" was introduced. As self-care increased, coping use scores decreased. In examining self-care energy and coping use, the multiple offenders had a greater use of coping strategies, such as evasive, optimistic, fatalistic, palliative, and self-reliant. In examining self-care energy and coping effectiveness, the multiple offenders had a greater effectiveness for coping strategies such as confrontive, evasive, optimistic, emotive and palliative. Marital status, age, age of first offense, relative in jail and personal income presented differences between first time and multiple offenders on self-care overall. A relative in jail by Type of Offender and marital status were significant. The multiple offenders with a relative in jail had a higher coping effectiveness in comparison to the first time offenders. Conclusions reached in the study indicated that multiple offenders functioned better in self-care and coping in the incarcerated environment than the first time offenders.

Keywords

Health Sciences, Nursing

Link to Full Text

http://access.library.miami.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:3090843