Title

Perspectives on belting and belting pedagogy: A comparison of teachers of classical voice students, teachers of nonclassical voice students, and music theater singers

Date of Award

2004

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A.)

Department

Music Performance

First Committee Member

Esther Jane Hardenbergh, Committee Chair

Abstract

The purpose of this essay is to examine the views of teachers of classical voice students, teachers of nonclassical voice students, and successful musical theater singers with regards to belting in an attempt to clarify misconceptions and perceived disagreements. The opportunities for performance in contemporary commercial music in North America outweigh those available to the classical singer. However, belting has been neglected with regards to research and especially pedagogy as compared to the classical voice.The study includes a review of literature that addresses the definition of the belt voice, the aesthetics of belting, gender issues, and vocal health pertaining to belting. The research questions addressed in the study are as follows: (1) How do teachers of classical voice students, teachers of nonclassical voice students, and musical theater singers define belting and what are the perceptions of physiological differences between belting and classical singing as articulated by each group; (2) What attributes or "qualities" do teachers of classical voice students, teachers of nonclassical voice students, and musical theater singers give to a sound they consider beautiful and what are some similarities and/or differences between these attributes and ones they would give to a classical sound; (3) How do teachers of classical voice students, teachers of nonclassical voice students, and musical theater singers view the teaching of belting using mechanical and psychological teaching techniques, and how do these practices differ between belting and classical singing; (4) What gender differences do teachers of classical voice students, teachers of nonclassical voice students, and successful musical theater singers note in the teaching of belting; (5) What potential vocal problems related to belting are identified by teachers of classical voice students, teachers of nonclassical voice students, and musical theater singers, and do each of the groups feel that the problems are inherent to the singing style or can be avoided?The author then interviewed fifteen participants consisting of three who primarily taught classical voice students, nine who primarily taught nonclassical voice students, and three musical theater singers. Each participant was asked twelve questions that directly pertained to the research questions outlined above and their answers were compared and contrasted and a summary is included.

Keywords

Music; Theater; Education, Music

Link to Full Text

http://access.library.miami.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:3125377