Title

Perceived importance of topics in a model foreign language in the elementary school (FLES*) methodology course

Date of Award

1990

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Department

Education

First Committee Member

Gilbert J. Cuevas, Committee Chair

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify topics for a model foreign language in the elementary school (FLES*) methodology course and to assess the extent to which foreign language methodology course instructors believe these topics should be included in a model FLES* methodology course curriculum.The research and literature review included topics on elementary school teacher preparation, foreign language teacher training, and a specific focus on the competencies for FLES* teacher preparation. The instrument A Survey of Topics in a Model FLES* Methodology Course assessed the extent to which foreign language methodology course instructors believed the identified topics should be covered in a model FLES* methodology course. A Likert scale was utilized to rate the recommended coverage of topics from "extensively" (four or more lectures), to "omit". Respondents (n = 71) were from a sample of individuals knowledgeable in foreign language methodology course content.Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the responses. Results of the survey indicate the FLES* methodology course model is composed of ten components covering: (a) pedagogy specific to foreign language instruction; (b) general pedagogy, with a focus on the elementary school child; and (c) the integration of foreign language instruction with the elementary school curriculum within the elementary school environment.A post hoc analysis compared the responses, according to the type(s) of foreign language methodology course the respondents had taught. The general consensus among all instructors was to give priority to those components dealing with foreign language instruction. FLES* methodology course instructors and those who had taught both FLES* and secondary methodology courses attributed equal importance to components on child growth and development, integrating foreign language instruction with the elementary school curriculum, and planning the FLES* program. Secondary methods course instructors and respondents who had never taught a methods course seemed to be less sensitive to this, and recommended child growth and development and the effects of FLES* instruction were components warranting limited coverage.

Keywords

Education, Language and Literature; Language, Modern; Education, Elementary; Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Link to Full Text

http://access.library.miami.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:9032074