Title

Multiple perspectives on the social functioning of students with learning disabilities: Teacher, parent, self, and peer reports

Date of Award

1992

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Education

First Committee Member

Sharon Vaughn, Committee Chair

Abstract

This study involved 44 students with learning disabilities (LD), 43 nonhandicapped low achieving students (LA), and 54 average-to-high achieving students (AHA) from grades 3 through 6. The social skills and behavior problems of students with LD, LA, and AHA were examined using the Social Skills Rating System. In addition, peer acceptance measures were obtained from the general education classes.Teacher ratings indicated that students with LD and LA were rated less positively than AHA students on all social skills factors: cooperation, assertion, and self-control. No group differences were found for parent ratings of social skills. Students with LD and LA had lower self-perceptions than AHA students on cooperation and assertion, LD students had lower self-perceptions than AHA students on empathy, and the groups did not differ on self-control. Peer acceptance ratings indicated that, for know and like ("How well do you know/like this classmate?"), the students with LD and LA were less well known and liked by peers than the AHA students. Social status classifications indicated that students with LD and LA were significantly over-represented in the rejected category than AHA students and were under-represented in the popular category. Teacher ratings indicated more problematic behavior for the students with LD and LA when compared with AHA on all behavior factors: externalizing, internalizing, and hyperactivity. Parent ratings indicated more problematic behavior for students with LD and LA than AHA students on two factors: internalizing and hyperactivity.Students with LD and LA students were not differentiated on any measures of social functioning included in this study. However, with the exception of parents' perceptions, students with LD and LA were rated less positively than AHA students. Implications of the different perspectives on social functioning and similarities between students with LD and LA students are discussed.

Keywords

Education, Special

Link to Full Text

http://access.library.miami.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:9227201