Title

Predictors of the concept of God in a sample of adult survivors of father-daughter incest

Date of Award

1993

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Counseling Psychology

First Committee Member

Herbert M. Dandes, Committee Chair

Abstract

There were two basic purposes of this study. The first was to ascertain if there was a difference in the concept of God of adult survivors of father-daughter incest and the concept of God of a comparison group of women with no reported history of incest. The second purpose was to compare the three testable theories ("Freudian," "Adlerian," and self-esteem) that attempt to explain the development of the God concept, by comparing the variable that each theory asserts as being the predictor of the concept of God. Thus, the concept of father ("Freudian" theory), the concept of one's preferred parent ("Adlerian" theory) and self-esteem were compared regarding their contribution to the variance of the concept of God of 41 adult survivors of father-daughter incest and of a comparison group of 41 women with no reported history of incest.Contrary to the researcher's prediction, t-tests and ANCOVAs revealed that there was no significant difference between the God concept of adult survivors of father-daughter incest and the God concept of the comparison group. Results of multiple regression analyses showed that for the incest group, self-esteem was the variable that accounted for the most variance (11.1%) of the loving factor of the concept of God while the concept of one's preferred parent was the variable that accounted for the most unique variance (20.2%) of the controlling factor of the concept of God. For the comparison group, the concept of one's preferred parent accounted for the most variance in the loving factor of the God-concept (20.2%) while none of the variables accounted for a significant amount of the variance of the controlling factor of the God concept.Post hoc analyses in the form of t-test and chi square procedures revealed that there was no difference in who the adult survivors of father-daughter incest identified as the preferred parent and who the control subjects identified as the preferred parent. Results of t-tests, however, showed that adult survivors of father-daughter incest had lower self-esteems and that they perceived their father and the parent they identified as the preferred parent as less loving, accepting, and forgiving than subjects in the control group. Correlation procedures revealed that for the incest group, self-esteem was positively correlated with a loving, accepting, and forgiving concept of God and negatively correlated with a controlling, restricting, and demanding concept of God. Time spent in therapy was also positively correlated with a loving, accepting, and forgiving father concept and negatively correlated with a controlling, restricting, and demanding father concept. For the control group, how loving, accepting, and forgiving one perceived one's preferred parent was positively correlated with how loving, accepting, and forgiving one perceived God.

Keywords

Religion, General; Psychology, Social; Education, Guidance and Counseling

Link to Full Text

http://access.library.miami.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:9331506