Title

The military and politics in modern Panama

Date of Award

1993

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

History

First Committee Member

Steve Stein, Committee Chair

Abstract

Scholars have tended to portray modern Panama as a reflection of international commerce and worldwide military concerns rather than as an independent people and an autonomous nation. This tendency, known as "geographic determinism," portrays the people of Panama as passive objects of change, an ancillary component of Panamanian history.Largely in response to what its author perceives as the methodological pitfalls of geographic determinism, this dissertation combines demographic analysis with political, institutional, and social history to identify and analyze factors that have shaped contemporary Panamanian society. Seen in this light, Panama's Canal and its military become integral components of a vibrant, sovereign republic. More important, this approach more accurately depicts Panamanians of all classes as resilient elements of a dynamic society, not merely circumstantial victims of elite exploitation and of United States imperialism.

Keywords

History, Latin American; History, United States; History, General

Link to Full Text

http://access.library.miami.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:9401828