Title

The relationship between school quality and student achievement in selected elementary schools in St Thomas, Virgin Islands

Date of Award

1993

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Educational Leadership

First Committee Member

John H. Croghan, Committee Chair

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between school quality and student achievement scores in higher and lower academically performing schools in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. Subjects included ninety-eight teachers from two matched pairs of schools. The schools were of comparable size, and the students had contrasting scores as defined by the Metropolitan Achievement Test (MAT 6). The Quality School Assessment Instrument (QSAI) was used to survey teachers' responses on how their schools compare on twelve attributes of effective schools (Instructional Leadership, School Mission, Focus on Instruction, Standards of Performance, learning Climate, Collaboration between Principal and Teachers, Instructional Objectives, Monitoring of Student Progress, Family and Community Involvement, Quality of Teaching, Leadership Quality and an Overall Measure of Quality). The mean scores of the two pairs of schools were examined. Four questions were also used to survey teachers on job satisfaction. These data were examined by calculating percentages. Additional data were obtained by analyzing the scores of third and fifth grade students on the MAT 6.The major finding from the study was: no conclusive evidence was found that established a clear-cut relationship between school quality attributes and selected moderate and low academically performing elementary schools in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. Rather, what emerged from the data was an irregular pattern of relationships. School A-1, a higher academically performing elementary school was rated higher than School A-2, a lower academically performing school on nine of twelve attributes of effective schools (School Mission, Focus on Instruction, Standards for Performance, learning Climate, Monitoring of Student Progress, Family and Community Involvement, Quality of Teaching, Leadership Quality, and an Overall Measure of Quality), while School B-2, a lower academically performing school, was rated higher than School B-1, a higher academically performing school on all twelve attributes of effective schools. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) The instrument (QSAI) used in the study does not clearly differentiate between selected moderate and low performing elementary schools in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. (2) Schools closely matched on student performance scores reveal similar school quality attributes. (3) Poor relationships exist between principals and teachers.

Keywords

Education, Administration

Link to Full Text

http://access.library.miami.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:9401833