Title

The physiological and psychosocial adaptation of individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes and non-insulin-dependent diabetes

Date of Award

1994

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Nursing

First Committee Member

Nancy Hogan, Committee Chair

Abstract

The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify, describe, and compare the physiological and psychosocial adaptation of individuals with insulin dependent diabetes and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Physiological and psychosocial adaptation were postulated to impact on the factors that influence the overall adaptation of individuals with diabetes. The null hypothesis of this study stated that there were no differences between individuals with insulin dependent diabetes and those with non-insulin dependent diabetes with regard to their physiological and psychosocial adaptation.This was a descriptive study of adaptation of 41 individuals with insulin dependent diabetes and 58 individuals with non-insulin dependent diabetes. Glycosylated hemoglobins were used to determine the degree of physiological adaptation of the participants. The Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale-Self Report identified and described the psychosocial adaptation of participants.Physiological adaptation was correlated to the social environment adaptation of individuals with insulin dependent diabetes, and to the health care orientation adaptation of individuals with non-insulin dependent diabetes. In individuals with insulin dependent diabetes, lower glycosylated hemoglobins correlated with poorer social environment adaptation: less social involvement and interest in social activities. In individuals with non-insulin dependent diabetes, lower glycosylated hemoglobins correlated with better health care adaptation: attitudes, perceptions and expectancies of health care.Significant differences between individuals with insulin dependent diabetes and non-insulin dependent diabetes were found in domestic environmental adaptation and psychological distress adaptation. Individuals with insulin dependent diabetes had poorer domestic environmental adaptation than the individuals with non-insulin dependent diabetes. The individuals with insulin dependent diabetes had poorer psychological distress adaptation than individuals with non-insulin dependent diabetes. These differences may be influenced by the stressors of the prescribed regimens.Physiological data alone are not sufficient to describe the adaptation of either individuals with insulin dependent diabetes or those with non-insulin dependent diabetes. The findings of this study identify the individuals with insulin dependent diabetes and those with non-insulin dependent diabetes as distinct groups with unique psychosocial adaptational needs. Nurses are challenged to assist individuals with diabetes mellitus in the variety of ways which increase and enhance both their physiological and psychosocial adaptation for more normal, full, and satisfying lives.

Keywords

Health Sciences, Nursing; Psychology, Physiological

Link to Full Text

http://access.library.miami.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:9432490