Title

Differences in self-perception and acculturation among Hispanic children with and without learning disabilities

Date of Award

1997

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Counseling Psychology

First Committee Member

Margaret Crosbie-Burnett, Committee Chair

Second Committee Member

Sharon Vaughn, Committee Member

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to determine if Hispanic children with learning disabilities (LD) differed on academic and nonacademic self-perception when compared to Hispanic children without LD. In addition, this study investigated what relationship, if any, level of acculturation has with academic and nonacademic self-perception within this population. A total of 78 Hispanic students from the 4th and 5th grades was selected from 3 public schools in Dade County. Thirty-nine children with LD and 39 children without LD were matched on age and gender. The measures that were individually administered to each child were the Self-Description Questionnaire I (SDQI) and the Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanic Youth (SASH-Y).The results indicated that the academic self-perceptions of the Hispanic children with LD did not differ from their peers without LD. There was a small but statistically significant difference in the scores obtained on the nonacademic self-perception scale, indicating that the children without LD had higher nonacademic self-perceptions. Yet, the children with and without LD scored above the normative mean on both the academic and nonacademic self-perception scales. There was no significant relationship between level of acculturation and academic and/or nonacademic self-perception. Some of the clinical and research implications from these findings that are discussed include how the academic and nonacademic self-perceptions between the children with and without LD might not be different within this Hispanic population; and how the measures should be revalidated with diverse populations. In addition, the possible influence of geographic location and school-based interventions on the findings of this study is discussed. Further research that investigates differences across cities and schools is recommended.

Keywords

Education, Guidance and Counseling; Psychology, Personality; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies

Link to Full Text

http://access.library.miami.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:9805931