Title

The effects of therapeutic taping on seated postural control in children with cerebral palsy, quadriplegia

Date of Award

1999

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Physical Therapy

First Committee Member

E. Brooks Applegate, Committee Chair

Abstract

A new intervention using therapeutic taping to address dysfunctional sitting control in children with cerebral palsy (CP) was investigated in this study. Subjects and methods. Eighteen children with CP, quadriparesis participated in the 12-week program, including 12 children with profound mental handicaps. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups, (1) taping + physical therapy, or (2) physical therapy only. The short term effects of the taping procedure were determined by measuring electromyographic and kinematic responses to 3 conditions, (1) pre-taped, (2) taped, and (3) post-taped. The long term effects were assessed with electromyography, kinematics, and the Gross Motor Function Measure tests at the baseline, 6-week and 12-week intervals. Results. For the short term effects, a factorial analysis of variance found that the coronal plane excursion for the post taped condition was significantly greater in the control group compared to the experimental group, p = 0.0296, but no significant differences were found for sagital plane excursion. For the long term effects, a factorial analysis of variance revealed no significant differences for the Gross Motor Function Measure scores. Likewise, no significant differences were found for the electromyography of the paraspinal musculature over the baseline 6 week, and 12-week intervals. However, the amount of lateral lean significantly increased from baseline to 6-weeks and 12-weeks, p = 0.0094. Conclusions. It was shown that therapeutic taping did not dramatically alter the short term and the long term musculoskeletal alignment of the children. The theoretical neural mechanism for increasing the child's 'body sense' for determining when the body was in space with continuous somatosensory (proprioceptive and tactile) input delivered through the adhesive tape was not supported with these findings. In short, the results of this study suggested that therapeutic taping did not effectively alter the musculoskeletal and neural systems to evoke a positive functional change in seated postural control in children with cerebral palsy, quadriparesis. However, subjective observation suggested that children with athetosis may benefit from therapeutic taping. Implications were made for future clinical studies investigating therapeutic taping programs for children with neuromotor deficits.

Keywords

Health Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy

Link to Full Text

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