Title

Predictors of academic success in baccalaureate nursing students

Date of Award

1999

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

First Committee Member

James D. McKinney, Committee Chair

Abstract

This retrospective correlational study was developed to examine the extent selected sociodemographic, experiential, and performance variables predicted performance on the Mosby Assesstest (Mosby, 1991) and the NCLEX-RN (National Council of State Boards of Nursing, 1991). A conceptual framework was developed with twelve independent variables selected to assess the potentially significant sources of variance in two dependent variables. The selection process for variables was based on previous research and their potential usefulness in the evaluation of student progress. The sociodemographic, experiential, and performance variables that were obtained prior to entry into the nursing major were hypothesized to affect nursing course performance, measured by nursing grade point average (NGPA) which in turn predicts the academic outcomes were specified in the conceptual framework. The preliminary research questions were (1) are there significant relationships among the independent variables that are expected to predict academic outcomes, and (2) are there significant relationships between each of the independent and dependent variables that are used to assess academic outcomes? The primary research questions were (1) what independent variables, singularly or in combination, best predicted academic outcomes as assessed by the Mosby Assesstest, and (2) what independent variables, singularly or in combination, best predicted academic outcomes as assessed by the NCLEX-RN? Data were collected from the records of all 160 baccalaureate nursing students who had graduated from the University of Miami School of Nursing between 1987 and 1993. Prenursing (PNGPA) and NGPA were calculated and Mosby Assesstest percentile ranks and NCLEX-RN pass/fail scores were retrieved for each student. Descriptive statistics, and Pearson product moment correlations were used in the primary analyses. Primary analyses of the data were conducted with forward stepwise multiple regression models. Secondary analyses of the data were conducted with backward elimination solution models to identify the "best predictive model" for each dependent variable. The "best predictive model" for the Mosby Assesstest was NGPA, PNGPA, and age. The "best predictive model" for the NCLEX-RN was NGPA. Recommendations for further study included the use of individual science/statistics course grades as independent variables, examination of predictors of NGPA, use of the computerized NCLEX-RN as a dependent variable, and development of a prediction model for both dependent variables.

Keywords

Health Sciences, Education; Health Sciences, Nursing; Education, Higher

Link to Full Text

http://access.library.miami.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:9934248