Title

Civilizational designs: The architecture of colonialism in the native parishes of Potosi

Date of Award

2000

Availability

Article

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

History

First Committee Member

Steve Stein, Committee Chair

Second Committee Member

Thomas A. Abercrombie, Committee Member

Abstract

This dissertation illustrates the complexity of the cultural and social impact of native resettlement by focusing on ecclesiastical architecture and native cofradias, areas in which Spaniards profoundly affected the everyday life of natives in colonial Potosi. I contend that architectural forms and space served not only as places of worship but as a means of inculcating new cultural habits, new understandings of space and time, through which indigenous cultural patterns were radically transformed. I also demonstrate that natives who resided in the parishes used originally religious Spanish institutions, in particular the cofradia organization, and their experience of parish life in Potosi to adapt and appropriate colonial impositions for their particular needs. Through their participation in these organizations, they creatively reinforced community solidarity, relative autonomy, and social recognition.

Keywords

History, Latin American

Link to Full Text

http://access.library.miami.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:9992513