Publication Date

2014-04-24

Availability

Open access

Embargo Period

2014-04-24

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PHD)

Department

Marine Geology and Geophysics (Marine)

Date of Defense

2014-03-17

First Committee Member

Falk C. Amelung

Second Committee Member

Keir Becker

Third Committee Member

Guoqing Lin

Fourth Committee Member

Shimon Wdowinski

Fifth Committee Member

Michael P. Poland

Abstract

Basaltic shields forming ocean island volcanoes, in particular those of Hawai‘i and of the Galápagos Islands, constitute some of the largest volcanic features on Earth. Understanding subsurface processes such as those controlling magma supply, storage and migration at these volcanoes, is essential to any attempt to anticipate their future behavior. Because these processes are hidden beneath the surface, geophysical measurements may represent the best tool to study them. This dissertation presents a series of studies carried out at Hawaiian and Galápagos volcanoes where the dynamics of magma supply, storage and migration are investigated primarily using space-born interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements of the surface displacement. Other ground-based geophysical methods, such as microgravity, are also used and combined with the InSAR data.

Keywords

Basaltic shields; Ocean island volcanoes; Hawaii; Galapagos; InSAR; gravimetry

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