Publication Date

2016-07-29

Availability

Open access

Embargo Period

2016-07-29

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PHD)

Department

Teaching and Learning (Education)

Date of Defense

2016-07-01

First Committee Member

Wendy Cavendish

Second Committee Member

Batya Elbaum

Third Committee Member

Walter G. Secada

Fourth Committee Member

Soyeon Ahn

Abstract

Academic self-concept has been extensively studied in terms of its relationship with academic achievement. The existing research has portrayed three theoretical models for this relationship: Self-Enhancement Model, Skill Development Model, and Reciprocal Model. The majority of results have provided support for a Reciprocal Model. So far, little research has been done in this area for students with learning disabilities (LD). Previous research has suggested that students without and with LD demonstrate differing developmental patterns in academic self-concept and math achievement. This study thus examined the relationship between academic self-concept and math achievement among students without and with LD. Further, the relationship between academic self-concept and math achievement may differ based on the types of math achievement measures used. Thus, this study also examined the relationship between academic self-concept and math achievement using two types of math achievement measures: high-stakes (math Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test [MFCAT]) and low-takes (Woodcock-Johnson III Broad Math Test [WBMT]) standardized tests. This study used data from an existing federally-funded seven-year longitudinal study database (2001–2008, Principal Investigator: Marjorie Montague), which included 165 students without LD and 30 students with LD. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between academic self-concept and two measures of math achievement from Grades 8 to 10 at different time points in early and late adolescence. The findings of this study found that WBMT scores in Grade 8 significantly predicted academic self-concept in Grade 10 in both students without and with LD. However, when using the MFCAT measure, MFCAT scores in Grade 8 predicted academic self-concept in Grade 10 only in students without LD but not students with LD. Recommendations for practice and future research are provided.

Keywords

Academic self-concept; math achievement; learning disabilities

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