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Publication Date

2017-06-24

Availability

UM campus only

Embargo Period

2019-06-24

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PHD)

Department

Communication Studies (Communication)

Date of Defense

2017-05-18

First Committee Member

Susan E. Morgan

Second Committee Member

Nicholas Carcioppolo

Third Committee Member

Tyler R. Harrison

Fourth Committee Member

Alberto Cairo

Abstract

Data visualization has been widely adopted in variety of areas, including health issues such as vaccine efficacy. Additionally, rapid technological development has enabled more advanced and creative data visualization formats such as interactive data layouts in which individuals interact with visual datasets and receive tailored information. Although anecdotally there exists support for data visualization as a more user friendly presentation than charts and graphs for presenting large amount of numeric information, identifying relationships and patterns, and pinpointing emerging trends, there is a lack of empirical evidence from social scientific studies supporting this argument. Utilizing an experimental design with three message conditions (written text, static visualization, and interactive data visualization), this study examined the effectiveness of data visualizations on facilitating individual’s comprehension of information about HPV vaccination as well as influencing individual’s decision making on HPV vaccination. Additionally, built upon the theoretical framework of the Extended Parallel Process Model and Fuzzy-Trace Theory, the study explored the underlying mechanism of data visualization for persuasion. The findings of this study shed theoretical and practical light on the understanding of data visualization for promoting positive behavioral changes within the context of HPV prevention. Implications of this study and recommendations for future research directions are enclosed.

Keywords

data visualization; Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM); Fuzzy Trace Theory (FTT); HPV and vaccination; comprehension; persuasion

Available for download on Monday, June 24, 2019

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