Publication Date

2009-05-09

Availability

Open access

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PHD)

Department

Kinesiology and Sport Sciences (Education)

Date of Defense

2009-04-14

First Committee Member

Arlette Perry - Committee Chair

Second Committee Member

Joseph Signorile - Committee Member

Third Committee Member

Kent Burnett - Committee Member

Fourth Committee Member

Arthur laPerriere - Committee Member

Abstract

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 can compromise pulmonary function at all stages of the disease. The present study examined whether there were differences in resting and exercising pulmonary function among sedentary, resistance-trained and aerobically-trained, early symptomatic, HIV-1+ men. Forty five subjects, 15 per group, were enrolled. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed differences in demographics for age [F (2, 42) = 5.14, p<0.01)], weight [F (2, 42) = 4.84, p<0.01)], body mass index [F (2, 42) = 9.50, p<0.01)] and average years HIV-1+ [F (2, 42) = 4.78, p<0.01)]. A multiple analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) showed differences in resting pulmonary function [F (8, 72) = 7.164, P = 0.01]. Univariate ANOVA's and Bonferroni post-hoc comparisons showed the aerobically-trained group had higher forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) than the resistance-trained and sedentary groups (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively), higher forced vital capacity (FVC) (p<0.01, for both), higher maximum voluntary ventilation (p<0.01, for both) and higher FEV1/FVC ratios than the sedentary group only (p<0.01). The resistance-trained group also showed higher FEV1 (p<0.01) and FEV1/FVC (p<0.01) than the sedentary group. For exercising pulmonary function, significant differences in our MANCOVA were found [F (12, 68) = 12.73, P = 0.001]. Univariate ANOVA's and Bonferroni post-hoc comparisons showed that the aerobically-trained group had higher dyspnea index than the resistance-trained and sedentary groups (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively), higher ventilatory efficiency (RR/VE max) than the resistance-trained and sedentary groups (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively), higher maximum minute ventilation (VE max) (p<0.01, for both), higher peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) (p<0.01, for both) and lower dead space (VD/VT) (p<0.01, for both). The resistance-trained group also showed higher peak VO2 (p<0.01), lower VD/VT (p<0.01) and lower RR/VE max (p<0.01) than the sedentary group. Results suggest that aerobically-trained, and to a lesser extent, resistance-trained seropositives possessed superior resting and exercising pulmonary function compared to sedentary seropositive males.

Keywords

Lung Function; Resistance Training; Aerobic Training; AIDS; HIV; Pulmonary Function

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