Publication Date

2010-05-03

Availability

Open access

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PHD)

Department

Music Theory and Composition (Music)

Date of Defense

2010-04-08

First Committee Member

Stephen Zdzinski - Committee Chair

Second Committee Member

Joyce Jordan - Committee Member

Third Committee Member

Nicholas DeCarbo - Committee Member

Fourth Committee Member

Edward Asmus - Committee Member

Fifth Committee Member

Jill Kaplan - Outside Committee Member

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test a hypothesized model of aurally perceived performer-controlled musical factors that influence assessments of performance quality. Previous research studies on musical performance constructs, musical achievement, musical expression, and scale construction were examined to identify the factors that influence assessments of performance quality. A total of eight factors were identified: tone, intonation, rhythmic accuracy, articulation, tempo, dynamics, timbre, and interpretation. These factors were categorized as either technique or musical expression factors. Items representing these eight variables were chosen from previous research on scale development. Additional items, along with researcher created items, were also chosen to represent the variables of technique, musical expression and overall perceptions of performance quality. The 44 selected items were placed on the Aural Musical Performance Quality (AMPQ) measure and paired with a four-point Likert scale. The reliability for the AMPQ measure was reported at .977. A total of 58 volunteer adjudicators were recruited to evaluate four recordings that represented one of each instrumental category of interest: brass, woodwind, voice, and string. The resulting performance evaluations (N = 232) were analyzed using statistical regression and path analysis techniques. The results of the analysis provide empirical support for the existence of the model of aurally perceived performer-controlled musical factors. Technique demonstrated significant direct effects on overall perceptions of performance quality and musical expression. Musical expression also demonstrated a significant direct effect on overall perceptions of performance quality. The results of this study are consistent with hypothesized model of performer-controlled musical factors.

Keywords

Assessment; Performance Evaluation; Music Education; Path Analysis; Musical Performance; Modeling

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