Publication Date

2012-05-09

Availability

Embargoed

Embargo Period

2014-05-14

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PHD)

Department

International Studies (Arts and Sciences)

Date of Defense

2012-04-12

First Committee Member

Roger Kanet

Second Committee Member

Bruce Bagley

Third Committee Member

Ambler Moss

Fourth Committee Member

Brad McGuinn

Abstract

Recent experiences in Africa and Eastern Europe indicate that private security can be a useful tool for building state capacity. Since the end of the Cold War, private security has been extensively utilized by states. These that specialize in personal and site protection which include mainstream military tasks, such as transportation, intelligence gathering, medical skills, logistical support, and even direct combat involvement. This dissertation contributes to the current body of knowledge by examining the consequences of the use of private force to enhance state capacity in four contemporary cases in which the United States government has undertaken state-building operations. The objective of this research is to determine under what conditions, if any, private security companies (PSCs) build state capacity. This study seeks to clarify the consequences of privatizing security in specific cases of foreign intervention where institution-building by the sender state is a key objective.

Keywords

private military contractors; private security contractors; state-building, reconstruction

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