Publication Date

2012-11-30

Availability

Embargoed

Embargo Period

2013-11-30

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PHD)

Department

Marine Geology and Geophysics (Marine)

Date of Defense

2012-07-02

First Committee Member

Falk Amelung

Second Committee Member

Shimon Wdowinski

Third Committee Member

Timothy H. Dixon

Fourth Committee Member

Jacqueline Dixon

Abstract

Many discoveries have been made about the dynamics of active volcanoes around the world. Studies of the physical and chemical processes have lead to a better understanding of magma generation, evolution, and collection within the crust. The purpose of this research is to use space geodetic techniques to generate time series of surface displacements to study and monitor active volcanoes. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and global positioning system (GPS) data provide a way to measure the displacement associated with the migration and storage of magma within a volcano at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. With these data, we can determine changes in the rate of surface displacement at volcanoes, which can be an indicator for eruptive activity. Using Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii and the Galapagos Islands volcanoes as natural laboratories, this study uses InSAR time series along with GPS and seismic data to elucidate the details about the shallow magmatic systems and track the movement and storage of magma at these basaltic volcanoes.

Keywords

InSAR; Time Series; Volcano; Kilauea; Hawaii; Galapagos

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