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Publication Date

2010-01-01

Availability

UM campus only

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology (Arts and Sciences)

Date of Defense

2010-03-16

First Committee Member

Isaac Prilleltensky - Committee Co-Chair

Second Committee Member

Amy Weisman de Mamani - Committee Co-Chair

Third Committee Member

Daryl Greenfield - Committee Member

Abstract

This project evaluated the effect of religious symbols on self-control and self-monitoring. Based on psychological priming research and evidence demonstrating a correlation between religious conviction and self-control, it was hypothesized that exposure to subtle religious primes would increase self-control and self-monitoring. Assuming religious primes increased both variables, it was also hypothesized that self-monitoring would mediate the effect of the religious primes on self-control. In line with study hypotheses, exposure to religious primes did increase self-control, however no support was found for the effect of the religious primes on self-monitoring. As a result, a mediational model could not be tested. Study implications and directions for future research are discussed.

Keywords

Well-being; Health; Self-regulation; Religion; Religiosity

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