Publication Date

2008-01-01

Availability

Open access

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology (Arts and Sciences)

Date of Defense

2008-05-14

First Committee Member

Dr. Michael E. McCullough - Committee Chair

Second Committee Member

Dr. Armando J. Mendez - Committee Member

Third Committee Member

Dr. Phillip M. McCabe - Committee Member

Abstract

Following interpersonal transgressions, victims? neuroticism and agreeableness have been previously associated with post-conflict anxiety and forgiveness. However, the perceptions that victims have about their transgressors? personalities have received little attention. The current investigation examined relationships between victims? neuroticism and agreeableness, their perceptions of their transgressors? agreeableness, and postconflict anxiety and affiliative motivation measured via plasma cortisol and oxytocin as well as self-reports of post-conflict anxiety and forgiveness in premenopausal women. Victims who perceived their transgressors as more agreeable reported lower post-conflict anxiety, experienced less plasma cortisol reactivity following a simulated speech to the transgressor, and more self-reported forgiveness. Exploratory analyses also revealed that forgiveness was negatively associated with oxytocin reactivity.

Keywords

Interpersonal Conflict; Agreeableness; Cortisol; Forgiveness; Anxiety

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