Publication Date

2012-05-18

Availability

Open access

Embargo Period

2012-05-18

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Public Relations (Communication)

Date of Defense

2012-04-25

First Committee Member

Shannon B. Campbell

Second Committee Member

Joseph E. Uscinski

Third Committee Member

Maria Elles Scott

Abstract

Effects of the media on the outcomes of NCAA investigations were evaluated using content analysis techniques whereby news articles were mined for media classification, article tone and 14 different proposed penalties for athletic programs that were accused of violating the NCAA amateurism code. Three Division I institutions, all of which are historically prominent and known for probes into their football programs due to amateurism violations, were chosen for analysis; these include: Southern Methodist University, University of Miami and University of Southern California. It was predicted that media effects would exist, and agenda setting would be evident from journalists covering collegiate sports scandals. It was concluded that indeed, media effects stem from sports journalism, however the extent to which they exist needs to be further examined.

Keywords

college football; NCAA; amateurism; media effects; media influence; sports scandals

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