Publication Date

2016-06-22

Availability

Open access

Embargo Period

2016-06-22

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering (Engineering)

Date of Defense

2016-06-08

First Committee Member

Sung Hee Joo

Second Committee Member

James D. Englehardt

Third Committee Member

Andrea Bolognesi

Abstract

The aim of the present case study is investigating the toxic effects derived from nanosized zinc oxide nanoparticles toward the marine life. In particular, the present study evaluates for the first time the growth inhibition induced by both industrial-derived and sunscreen self-extracted zinc oxide nanoparticles on the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. The experiments, performed at the Environmental Engineering Laboratory of the University of Miami, showed that the toxic effects induced by nano-ZnO were influenced by the type of nanoparticle, as well as their concentration in aqueous media and the exposure time. Specifically, smaller, industrial-derived nano-ZnO induced a greater growth inhibition compared to sunscreen-derived ones, especially at lower nanoparticle concentration in the aqueous media. This behavior might indicate that at higher nanoparticle concentration the toxicity is controlled by nanoparticle aggregation (regardless of nanoparticle size), whereas at lower nanoparticle concentration the toxicity is influenced by the nanoparticle size, as well as nanoparticle type and exposure time. The aim of the present case study is investigating the toxic effects derived from nanosized zinc oxide nanoparticles toward the marine life. In particular, the present study evaluates for the first time the growth inhibition induced by both industrial-derived and sunscreen self-extracted zinc oxide nanoparticles on the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. The experiments, performed at the Environmental Engineering Laboratory of the University of Miami, showed that the toxic effects induced by nano-ZnO were influenced by the type of nanoparticle, as well as their concentration in aqueous media and the exposure time. Specifically, smaller, industrial-derived nano-ZnO induced a greater growth inhibition compared to sunscreen-derived ones, especially at lower nanoparticle concentration in the aqueous media. This behavior might indicate that at higher nanoparticle concentration the toxicity is controlled by nanoparticle aggregation (regardless of nanoparticle size), whereas at lower nanoparticle concentration the toxicity is influenced by the nanoparticle size, as well as nanoparticle type and exposure time.

Keywords

nanoparticles; zinc oxide; nanotoxicology; sunscreen; diatom; growth inhibition

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