Publication Date

2010-01-01

Availability

Open access

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Sociology (Arts and Sciences)

Date of Defense

2011-11-11

First Committee Member

Amie Nielsen - Committee Chair

Second Committee Member

Roger Dunham - Committee Member

Third Committee Member

Donna Coker - Outside Committee Member

Abstract

Despite the fact that all U.S. states offer some form of civil protection orders to intimate partner violence (IPV) victims, little research has assessed their efficacy. In this analysis, the effect of race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status on civil protection order effectiveness is examined. The results indicate that race/ethnicity, overall, is not a significant predictor in protection order efficacy. However, SES, as measured by the petitioner?s highest educational attainment, employment status, and income, is statistically related to repeat victimization and perceptions of efficacy. Policy recommendations and areas for future research are proposed.

Keywords

Domestic Violence; Restraining Orders; Social Class

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