Publication Date

2018-03-23

Availability

Open access

Embargo Period

2018-03-23

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology (Arts and Sciences)

Date of Defense

2018-03-08

First Committee Member

Brian D. Doss

Second Committee Member

Michael H. Antoni

Third Committee Member

Yui Matsuda

Abstract

The web-based program for distressed couples, OurRelationship (OR), has been found to significantly improve relationship and individual functioning. However, the program’s provision of paraprofessional coach support presents significant limitations to program dissemination and implementation. In an effort to further examine the role of coach support, the present study sought to assess program completion of the OR program with varying levels of paraprofessional support. Using an interrupted time series design, the current study aimed to compare completion rates of those who enrolled in a trial of OR with no coach support (n = 529 couples) to completion rates of a previous trial of OR in which couples were randomized to receive either one (n = 179 couples) or four (n = 177 couples) calls with a coach. Results revealed that individuals were significantly less likely to complete the OR program when they were not provided a coach than they were when provided with either one or four coach calls. Analyses of moderators of completion rates revealed that a coach was equally helpful across most demographic factors and measures of baseline relationship and individual functioning. However, Hispanic individuals experienced greater differences, and those with depressive symptoms experienced fewer differences, between the coach and no-coach trials. The findings highlight the growing need for online intervention researchers to develop and test alternate types of program support for participants who do not have access to a coach.

Keywords

couples; online intervention; program completion; relationship distress

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